Unit 6 East Asia and Southeast Asia

Exploring Our World: People, Places, and Cultures

Unit 6 Vocabulary List East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Flashcards East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Matching East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Word Search East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Concentration East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Hangman with Hints East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Hangman without Hints East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Jumbled Words East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 East & Southeast Asia Presentation

Unit 6 East & Southeast Asia Cornell Notes

Unit 6 Rags to Riches Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Rags to Riches History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Rags to Riches East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 CLOZE Fill in the Blank Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 CLOZE Fill in the Blank History & Cultures East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 CLOZE Fill in the Blank East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 Fling the Teacher Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Fling the Teacher History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Fling the Teacher East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 Walk the Plank Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Walk the Plank History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Walk the Plank East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 En Garde Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 En Garde History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 En Garde East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 Penalty Shootout Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Penalty Shootout History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Penalty Shootout East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 Hoopshoot Physical Geography & Climate East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Hoopshoot History & Culture East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Hoopshoot East & Southeast Asia Today

Unit 6 Battleship East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 Challenge Board East & Southeast Asia (Play the HTML version that loads!!! Don’t use the Flash version!!!)

Unit 6 Review East & Southeast Asia

Unit 6 KAHOOT! East & Southeast Asia

East Asia Map Practice

Southeast Asia Map Practice

East & Southeast Asia Drag and Drop

East & Southeast Asia Click on the Map

Southeast Asia Map Quiz

Asia Map Game

Chinese Puzzles – Tangrams

More Tangrams

Sudoku

Calligraphy Practice

Mahjong

Chinese Checkers

China Game

Emperor Game

Samurai Rebellion

Chapter 25: Physical Geography of East Asia and Southeast Asia

Chapter Overviews

About 2 billion people, roughly one-third the world’s population, live in the region of East Asia and Southeast Asia. It is one of the mostly densely populated areas of the world. The vast region extends from the mountains of inland China to the Pacific shores of Japan. Tectonic plate movements have created mountains and caused powerful earthquakes in parts of East Asia. Volcanic activity millions of years ago formed a chain of islands in the Pacific Ocean. East Asia’s only lowland areas are the North China Plain and the Manchurian Plain. Southeast Asia is south of China and has many peninsulas and thousands of islands. The mainland is crossed by cordilleras, between which are fertile river plains.

Seas and rivers play an important role in agriculture and trade in the region. The region is surrounded by oceans and seas that have served as trade routes and have provided fish for food. The most important rivers in East Asia flow through China from the Plateau of Tibet to the Pacific Ocean. The Yellow and Yangtze rivers provide transportation routes and fertile land for agriculture. Southeast Asia’s rivers are located on the mainland. Most flow south toward the Gulf of Thailand, an arm of the South China Sea.

An abundant supply of energy resources is found in the region. China, Indonesia, Brunei, and Malaysia have large oil deposits. China, North Korea, and Vietnam, among others, also mine coal. Several countries use hydroelectric power to meet their energy needs. The region also has a wealth of minerals, and some countries have timber.

Wind patterns greatly influence the climates in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Three different air masses bring cold, dry air; cool, dry air; and warm, moist air to the region. In winter, cold winds sweep down from Siberia to the northern parts of the region. In summer, the southern part of East Asia receives warm Pacific air and monsoons rains. Ocean currents affect the climate, particularly for the islands of the region. East Asia generally has middle latitude climates like those in the United States, while Southeast Asia has mostly tropical climates. The mountain areas of Indonesia and China have highland climates.

Exploring Our World: People, Places, and Cultures

Chapter 26: History and Cultures of East Asia and Southeast Asia

Chapter Overview

Powerful local empires ruled early East Asia and Southeast Asia, a region that is home to some of the world’s oldest civilizations. Early dynasties in China were centers of culture and innovation, and later dynasties contributed to China’s growth. China also influenced Korea and, through Korean, influenced early Japan in the arts, philosophy, government, and religion. China ruled much of what is now Vietnam, and Hindu traders from India reached parts of Southeast Asia, mixing their traditions with China’s. Europeans seeking the region’s resources gained control of much of the area beginning in the 1500s. Foreign spheres of influence in China developed because of trade, and Japan’s government adopted western technology. Korea and all areas of Southeast Asia except Thailand were dominated by European control. However, by the mid-1900s, most Asian countries had gained independence.

Today, several nations have developed strong economies. Japan worked closely with business to plan and develop economic growth and now has the world’s second-largest economy after the United States. The Asian Tigers—South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong—have built strong, modern economies. In addition, China has also become a major economic power, developing somewhat later due to its Communist leadership. East Asia and Southeast Asia is one of the world’s most densely populated regions. Rapid population growth has created challenges for many countries. In China, government policy limits the number of children a family can have. In countries such as Cambodia and Laos, high birthrates contribute to growth, while countries like Japan and South Korea are shrinking in population. Nearly 60 percent of people live in rural areas in the region, but cities in East Asia and Southeast Asia are centers of industry and commerce. They are some of the largest cities in the world, and many people leave rural areas to move to cities for higher standards of living.

Traditional beliefs and practices have influenced daily life, but the region has also been affected by modern technology and Western culture. Within each East Asian country, people tend to be ethnically similar. In Southeast Asia, the population is more diverse and speaks hundreds of different languages. All the world’s major religions are practiced in the region, and art forms such as calligraphy, architecture, and poetry continue to thrive. The family is the center of social life, a lifestyle that reflects the ideas of Confucius, especially in East Asia. Education is highly valued in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Some traditions are changing because of Western influences.

Exploring Our World: People, Places, and Cultures

Chapter 27: East Asia and Southeast Asia Today

Chapter Overview

The region of East Asia and Southeast Asia has experienced economic growth since the late 1900s. Many of the countries in the region have become important trading partners with the United States and other nations around the world. China is one of these countries. China’s government is controlled by the Chinese Communist Party. Although in recent years China’s leaders have allowed people more economic freedom, they still keep tight control over political activities. Cities are growing rapidly as people leave small villages in hopes of finding better-paying jobs. Because of some economic reform, people can now choose the jobs they want. China’s economy is growing as a result of these reforms. China’s neighbors, Taiwan and Mongolia, have been influenced by their nearness to China. Taiwan has a strong industrial economy despite tensions with China over its independence. Taiwan also has a highly educated workforce and is moving toward democracy. Mongolia’s economy relies on products from herd animals such as sheep, goats, cattle, and horses. In the 1990s, Mongolia abandoned its Communist system of government.

Japan, a collection of four large islands and thousands of smaller ones, lies off the coast of East Asia. Its government is a constitutional monarchy without a large military, but Japan is a strong world economic power. Japan’s economy is industrial; it produces cars, ships, cameras, and consumer electronics among other products. The government works closely with business to advance the economy. However, it faces growing competition from other countries in the region and an aging population that will result in a smaller workforce. Because of Japan’s geography and limited amounts of land, people are crowded into urban areas. Daily life in Japan is a mix of traditional and modern ways. Clothing, housing, art, and architecture reflect the traditions of the country and are also influenced by Western ideas.

North and South Korea lie on the same peninsula but are very different countries. North Korea has a Communist government as a result of being occupied by the Soviet Union after World War II. In the 1950s, North Korea attacked South Korea to bring it under Communist rule but was not successful. The United States helped South Korea in this war. After the Korean War, South Korea’s leaders rebuilt and industrialized the economy. As a result, South Korea is now an economic leader and has begun to be involved in world affairs. In contrast, North Korea’s leaders have isolated the country from the rest of the world. Its Communist leaders devote more resources to the military and do not develop industry. North Korea’s government controls the political, economic, and social lives of its people. Poverty is widespread, and many people have left the country in search of better conditions.

Mainland Southeast Asia is a mix of stronger and weaker economies. Countries like Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore have developed industry and have seen economic growth. Most people in Myanmar and Thailand are Buddhists. Myanmar is a socialist country that exports wood products, gas, rice, and beans. Thailand benefits from tourism and some exports. Malaysia, on the southern end of the Malay Peninsula and the island of Borneo, exports a great amount of raw material and recently has had success exporting goods such as electronics and cars. Singapore, on the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, is one of the world’s most productive economies, and its people enjoy a high standard of living. Other Southeast Asia countries such as Laos and Cambodia have weaker economies, primarily because of present or past rule by Communist leaders. Vietnam has enjoyed some growth, but its Communist policies inhibit growth. The islands of Southeast Asia have economies that rely on natural resources and agriculture. Indonesia and Brunei have oil and gas reserves, while East Timor people live by farming. The Philippines exports rice, sugarcane, bananas, and other agricultural products.